Close
The Daily Dirt

I am interested in helping organic farmers adapt to climate change. And one very important part of that is constructing and maintaining a strong community that supports organic production. That community needs to be farmers, buyers (yes Whole Foods, etc.), and customers. Consumers need to eat with our heart and minds as well as body. […]

Read more

Melody Myers, a VP for United Natural Foods and sponsor of the 2013 Georgia Organics conference, wrote this update on the farm bill and the priorities for more organic production, research and promotions. The organic message is clear and concise:   Pass a comprehensive Farm Bill this year! A current farm bill with organic priorities will support […]

Read more

It’s touted as North American’s premier farm show. After seeing the miles of tractors, farm equipment, and commodity crop demonstrations, nobody can disagree. Over 100,000 people attend the Sunbelt Ag Expo each year. Farmers from across the region come to see the latest products and systems that promise greater efficiencies and improved yields. All of […]

Read more

We’re pretty big fans of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Margaret Mellon, especially after reading her excellent takedown of the catchphrase “Feed the world”:  “It seems to come up with depressing regularity to justify, among other things, pesticides, industrial-scale monoculture, and biotechnology, all of which we must embrace—all together now—to feed the world. What gets […]

Read more

We’re in the research stage of getting together our next cover story for The Dirt and coming across some great info that we thought we’d share, just because it’s info that just needs to be shared with as many people as possible, over and over again. The argument over whether organic agriculture can feed the world won’t […]

Read more

As told by Sandi Johnson of Hexemaus Farms. How our farm got its name is a really personal story. We don’t mind sharing the story, but it’s kind of a tear-jerker for some folks. Years ago, when my late husband and I were young (before we got married) he called me hexe augen (German for […]

Read more

As told by Rebecca WIlliams. Basically, my English major background and love of word origins combined with farming practices is where the name came from. When I was trying to think of a name, the philosophical concept of polyculture over monoculture was really important to me. At some point the word “manifold” popped into my mind. […]

Read more

As told by Todd McCain of the R Square Farm in Winder. My kids names are Ryan and Rachel (hence the R).  And my wife teaches middles school math (hence the square).  So to incorporate all of them into the name (and to be unique  and to give folks something easy to remember) we named […]

Read more

Love for the modern grocery-store turkey must be torture. They’re bred to have breasts so large that the males can’t mount females to mate, so artificial insemination is what’s kept their genetic tradition on so many dinner plates come the end of November. This bothered Cathy Payne. She started buying heritage breed turkeys, and reading […]

Read more

We can tell you what’s bugging us this summer—the 28-spotted ladybug! (Or ladybird, depending on whether you’re British or not.) Ladybugs are usually beneficial insects in a growing environment because they eat aphids like it’s their job, but the 28-spotted variety would rather devour potatoes and other solanaceous crops like tomatoes and peppers, Cucurbitaceae crops like cucumbers and squash, and Fabaceae crops […]

Read more