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As told by Sandi Johnson of Hexemaus Farms. How our farm got its name is a really personal story. We don’t mind sharing the story, but it’s kind of a tear-jerker for some folks. Years ago, when my late husband and I were young (before we got married) he called me hexe augen (German for […]

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As told by Rebecca WIlliams. Basically, my English major background and love of word origins combined with farming practices is where the name came from. When I was trying to think of a name, the philosophical concept of polyculture over monoculture was really important to me. At some point the word “manifold” popped into my mind. […]

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As told by Todd McCain of the R Square Farm in Winder. My kids names are Ryan and Rachel (hence the R).  And my wife teaches middles school math (hence the square).  So to incorporate all of them into the name (and to be unique  and to give folks something easy to remember) we named […]

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Love for the modern grocery-store turkey must be torture. They’re bred to have breasts so large that the males can’t mount females to mate, so artificial insemination is what’s kept their genetic tradition on so many dinner plates come the end of November. This bothered Cathy Payne. She started buying heritage breed turkeys, and reading […]

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We can tell you what’s bugging us this summer—the 28-spotted ladybug! (Or ladybird, depending on whether you’re British or not.) Ladybugs are usually beneficial insects in a growing environment because they eat aphids like it’s their job, but the 28-spotted variety would rather devour potatoes and other solanaceous crops like tomatoes and peppers, Cucurbitaceae crops like cucumbers and squash, and Fabaceae crops […]

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The talented team at Anthony-Masterson Productions have a couple new videos in our Field Trip! series, and both feature the fine folks at Jenny Jack Sun Farm in Pine Mountain. Here, Jenny Jackson talks about the best ways to grow and plant sweet potato slips. Her method allows you to save seeds by using the […]

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UPDATE: The split farm bill was passed by the House of Representatives. The vote, 216-208, was right down party lines; no Democrats voted for it. From our friends at the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition: “If it was merely a face-saving effort following the defeat of the new farm bill a few weeks ago – with no […]

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Within the next decade the majority of American farmers will be retirees. According to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, over 31 percent of Georgia’s 47,000 farmers are 65 or above., and as the average age of the country’s agricultural operators continues to move toward 60, farming faces a looming crisis: Who will feed current and […]

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Georgia Organics Farmer Services Coordinator Donn Cooper is a busy man! In the last two weeks, he’s been all over the state speaking at on-farm workshops, farmers forums, and conferences. Here’s a breakdown of what he’s been up to: Wednesday, June 19—Americus Betsy Ross from Sustainable Growth Texas led a workshop at Koinonia Farm on biological […]

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is attempting to raise the allowed residue level of the herbicide Roundup, (glyphosate) on food. If you are curious about pesticide use in Georgia, check this out. But wait! It’s not a done deal and there’s something you can do about it! Please keep reading. Tweet

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