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Whether you’re interested in becoming a full-time organic farmer or you just want to produce delicious, healthy food in your backyard, Lynn Pugh’s legendary Organic Farming and Gardening course will teach you the basics so you can start growing sustainably. Cane Creek Farm is the classroom, and you’ll engage in plenty of hands-on activities while […]

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As summer quickly approaches, now is the time to finalize summer plans for your school garden.  First, your school garden team should decide if you want to continue growing during the summer months.  After all the hard work you’ve put into the garden throughout the year, it may be hard to think about not growing […]

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By Rachel Waldron, FoodCorps Service Member Because there are so many great activities to do out in the garden during the springtime, its difficult to get the kids excited about staying inside. But when a substitute teacher does not take the students out to the garden, I try to bring aspects of the garden inside. […]

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Want to transition to a chemical-free lawn? Danna Cain of Home & Garden Design is here to help. Her Atlanta landscape architecture firm specializes in “outdoor living areas that are beautiful, artistic, functional, eco friendly and sustainable.” This Q&A originally ran in the Summer 2014 edition of the Dirt, our member newsletter. 1. Try a […]

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Our lawns are also an opportunity for health as well as beauty. And when we wanted to write about chemical-free lawn care for the Summer 2014 edition of the Dirt, our member newsletter, we knew Sustenance Design‘s Lindsey Mann would be able to give us the scoop. She and her team create ecologically supportive landscapes, […]

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by Paula Maia Fernandes A garden is capable of growing much more than beautiful plants, it can also grow a community. Lola Blum has on her name what she is all about – to help blooming community’s core values such as healthy living skills, community development, environmental education, and artistic expression through growing a garden. Blum is the Co-Founder […]

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Community gardens not only increase people’s consumption of fresh produce, but they also improve overall physical and mental health of kids and adults alike by getting them outdoors, interacting with other people in their communities, and giving them the chance to later cook the foods they’ve personally grown and nurtured. Fred Conrad is the community garden coordinator […]

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With the population of the monarch butterfly at risk, conservationists are working to restore the habitats of these important pollinators, and the Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta is putting an important call out to Georgians to collect native milkweed seed. Milkweed and other nectar plants are important for habitat creation for pollinators, such as the monarch. […]

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The middle school in my neighborhood has a great school garden, with fruit trees, berry bushes, and raised beds growing tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and basil. LOTS of basil. Do you have a lot of basil in your school garden? Wondering what to do with it all? Throw a Back to School Pesto Party! Kids can […]

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We can tell you what’s bugging us this summer—the 28-spotted ladybug! (Or ladybird, depending on whether you’re British or not.) Ladybugs are usually beneficial insects in a growing environment because they eat aphids like it’s their job, but the 28-spotted variety would rather devour potatoes and other solanaceous crops like tomatoes and peppers, Cucurbitaceae crops like cucumbers and squash, and Fabaceae crops […]

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