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Golden Radish Criteria Examples from Previous Golden Radish Recipients & Other Resources

1.Feature locally grown items in the school cafeteria, during breakfast, and/or lunch.

Examples:

  • Grady County Schools featured locally grown fruits and vegetables in addition to grass fed beef from White Oak Pastures in Early County during their Feed My School for a Week celebrations.
  • Bibb County Schools featured locally grown products monthly on school menus. Items include Vidalia onions, strawberries, romaine lettuce, baby carrots, peaches, blueberries, sweet potatoes, and watermelon. During Feed My School week students enjoyed shrimp from Georgia, locally grown and milled wheat used to bake rolls, muffins, and cookies, BBQ from a farm in Washington County, roast beef from Monroe County, local strawberries and peaches from a farm within 5 miles of the school, local honey from an apiary, and pickles from a farm within 10 miles of the school. Working with local farmers was a great learning experience and provided a vast number of farmer resources for acquiring additional local items. Many of these items and the knowledge learned as to where and how to procure will be used to acquire additional items for regular menu choice item in the coming year.
  • Barrow County Schools featured different locally grown products on the menu each month. They highlighted the item with the color of the food. For example, a sweet potato was highlighted in orange and the words “locally grown” were listed before the item.
  • By utilizing the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, Laurens County Schools was able to provide many Georgia Grown produce items including collards, muscadines, heirloom apples, kale, summer squash, acorn squash, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, cabbage, strawberries and peaches. Other locally grown produce featured during lunch included strawberries, swiss chard, lettuce, potatoes, and turnips either locally procured or grown in school gardens.
  • Other Resources

 2. Students participate in taste tests that feature locally grown food.

Examples:

  • As part of a district-wide taste testing event, a fresh, locally grown kale and apple salad was taste-tested at all 94 Fulton County Schools with student and staff feedback informally collected to determine acceptance. In addition, nine schools across the district offered samples of locally grown, 100% blueberry juice, and students filled out a taste test survey. Seven schools across the district also offered samples of a yogurt parfait made with locally produced dairy and students completed a taste test survey.
  • Taste tests in Forsyth County Schools were conducted monthly at one elementary school, including taste tests of blueberry juice and produce from the school garden.
  • Students in the Clarke County School District had the opportunity to taste test blueberries, kale chips, broccoli, carrots, green peppers, cucumbers, cabbage and cherry tomatoes. The majority of these items were grown in school gardens and the UGArden.  In addition, all of the elementary schools participated in the Lettuce Try It October Farm to School Month campaign
  • Savannah-Chatham County students students sampled locally grown fruits and vegetables more than 120 times, including “Try It Tuesdays” at five schools and HealthMPowers taste tests at 11 schools
  • Other Resources

3.Students interact with a farmer through field trips to farms that grow food and/or through farmer visits to the school.

Examples:

  • In Fannin County, students learned about growing and processing food firsthand on four different field trips, including a visit to a local cannery where they made homemade soup and canned apples with locally grown apples.
  • In Habersham County, farmers visited schools 13 times for taste tests. Student ambassadors went on four different farm field trips and all 6th graders at Wilbanks Middle School went to Chattooga Belle Farm.
  • Tift County School third grade students participate in a district wide Children’s Farm Day each year. All third grade students visit the school district farm and participate in various interactive stations with farmers. Students are able to view the complete process of how various vegetables and crops are planted, harvest, and prepared for their plate. During Farm to School day, several local farmers, along with various community leaders visited our 9th grade campus where students demonstrated how to transplant items from the school’s greenhouse setting to the school garden.
  • Burke County Schools had four field trips to a local farm for Ag in the Classroom Day and they hosted dairy farmers for their World Milk Day Celebration.
  • Other Resources

 4.Farm to school promotions are done throughout the school environment

Examples:

  • Carrollton City Schools developed their own locally grown logo that they use to identify locally grown on the serving lines and for promotional uses. They posted local food items on Nutrition Education Boards in and around the cafeterias. They promoted locally grown and farm to school initiatives in the Wellness Newsletter (printed and web based) and school board meetings.
  • Each month, the menu at four of the Bleckley County Schools featured a Georgia grown item. The item was noted on the menu, which is online and read over the intercom system each day.
  • Cobb County Food and Nutrition Services includes National Farm to School Month as one of their mandatory nutrition education promotions. In addition to serving and featuring locally grown items, managers decorate cafeterias and make announcements.
  • Other Resources

5.Teachers integrate farm to school into standards-based curriculum.

Examples:

  • Forsyth County science labs conducted experiments and lessons that tied into items being offered in cafeteria. Lesson also centered on Georgia agriculture and farming. Lessons in the garden incorporated technology, math, science and geography.
  • Tift County teachers promote farm to school lessons through various creative assignments from building raised planting beds to lessons on plant growth. The CTAE `02.471 Plant Science/Horticulture gives students an opportunity to learn Basic Agriculture Science. Len Lastinger’s students used the seedling as a science exercise to see what rate the garden grew at with the outside influence sun, soil, and water. The ongoing lesson was blended into a math exercise with observation of one seed producing how much produce and then how many seeds being produce by each piece of produce.
  • Decatur City Schools’ middle school students created a hydroponic system to grow collard greens with recycled milk cartons for a STEM lesson.
  • Elbert County kindergarten students planted basil seeds, nurtured their plants until ready to transplant, and took home their seedlings along with instructions about how to plant them as part of a standards-based lesson.
  • Jackson County teachers took advantage of school gardens to provide a number of hands on experiences to students. Gardens were used as laboratory settings in many lessons. Farm to school components are often infused into math, science, social studies, and language arts lessons. Lessons include what plants need to grow, soil investigation, parts of a plants, food chains, what seeds need, flowers and leaves, and more.
  • Other Resources

6.Schools have edible gardens.

Examples:

  • Commerce Primary School has 9 raised beds and Commerce Elementary School has 6 raised beds. The local Farm Bureau was instrumental in getting the gardens started.  They provided all the materials and soil, as well as built and installed the gardens at no cost to the school.  The local garden club and Feed & Seed business have donated money, supplies, plants, and seeds for the gardens.
  • Over 75% of City Schools of Decatur schools have edible gardens. Many of students engage in activities in the gardens, including growing foods for taste testing.
  • Carrollton City Schools have raised garden beds at two of four schools. These gardens have produced collard greens, tomatoes, lettuce, and radishes.
  • Other Resources

 7.Students participate in hands-on cooking and food activities with chefs, teachers, parents, school nutrition staff, or other leaders.

Examples:

  • Tift County students participated during the Children’s Farm Day at the local district farm in the preparation of kale chips and braised collard greens. Students assisted the School Nutrition Director whom is also a certified chef with the preparations.
  • The Cobb County School Nutrition department developed several lessons to use with mobile cooking carts in 34 of the district’s schools.
  • Many schools within Atlanta Public Schools have cooking clubs and after-school programs designed to educate students on nutrition and encourage students to sample new foods. Some examples of foods that are being prepared in the classroom include smoothies, coleslaw, fruit and vegetable salads, sweet potato biscuits, apple sauce, okra fritters, and salad dressing.
  • Other Resources

8.Parents and/or community members are involved in the farm to school program.

Examples:

  • Effingham County coordinated a community-wide cooking demonstration at Effingham College and Career Academy featuring a local chef and farmer on how to make a healthy salad.
  • Marietta City Schools collaborated with Kennesaw State University students on the design and execution of farm to school lessons, including gardening and composting fruit and vegetable scraps.
  • Carrollton City parents and community members were members of the farm to school team/Parent Advisory Council, participated in community events, helped to install, prepare and care for raised bed gardens, assisted us with farm to school promotions in our community and helped with the integration of farm to school to the Summer Feeding Program.
  • Forsyth County parents assisted with taste tests, organized vendors for their farmers market, brought in many of the presentations and were always available to supervise and conduct crowd control. Community members attended their “Dress like a Farmer day” and the final week of Feed My School for a Week activities.
  • Laurens County Young Farmer Association aided in the construction of 32 garden beds at 5 schools.
  • Other Resources

9.School staff (i.e.: teachers, school nutrition staff, administration, etc.) participate in farm to school professional development training.*

*Please note that the professional development training must be school-wide or district-wide to count. Select staff members attending a conference that includes farm to school content does NOT count as school-wide or district-wide professional development.

Examples:

  • Carrolton City staff development training included several farm to school topics including knife skills training for preparing locally grown, equipment training for cutting locally grown, recipe development with locally grown items, and training on their district’s farm to school initiatives and locally grown.
  • Habersham County School nutrition staff received training on utilizing butternut squash in school meals from a local chef.
  • Bibb County Schools recurring manager meetings include a farm to school professional learning segment on featured items, promotions, preparation, and lessons.

 10.Farm to school language is adopted into a district/LEA-wide policy or procedure (i.e.: Wellness Policy).

Examples: